Can Scar Tissue in Uterus Cause Infertility?

Infertility

Yes, scar tissue in the uterus, also known as intrauterine adhesions or Asherman’s syndrome, can potentially lead to infertility or difficulty in achieving pregnancy.

Intrauterine adhesions occur when scar tissue forms inside the uterus, often as a result of uterine surgery (such as dilation and curettage procedures following a miscarriage, abortion, or to remove polyps) or due to infections or inflammation of the uterine lining. This scar tissue can cause the walls of the uterus to stick together or form bands of tissue, leading to various complications, including:

  • Menstrual Irregularities: Intrauterine adhesions can cause changes in menstrual flow, such as lighter or absent periods, as the scar tissue may obstruct the normal shedding of the uterine lining.
  • Infertility: Scar tissue within the uterus can interfere with embryo implantation and proper development. It can create an inhospitable environment for a fertilized egg to implant and grow, thereby leading to difficulties in conception or recurrent miscarriages.
  • Pregnancy Complications: In cases where pregnancy occurs despite intrauterine adhesions, there might be an increased risk of complications such as preterm birth, miscarriage, or abnormal placental attachment.

Diagnosis of intrauterine adhesions is typically done through imaging tests such as hysteroscopy, saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS), or hysterosalpingography (HSG). Treatment involves a minimally invasive procedure called hysteroscopic adhesiolysis, where the scar tissue is surgically removed to restore the normal uterine cavity.

It’s essential for individuals experiencing fertility issues or recurrent pregnancy loss to consult with a healthcare provider specializing in reproductive health. They can conduct appropriate tests to identify any underlying causes, such as intrauterine adhesions, and recommend suitable treatment options to address the condition and improve the chances of achieving a successful pregnancy.

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